E-Books Receive Mixed Reviews in the Classroom

One year is a relatively short period of time but represents an eternity when evaluating the products offered in the nascent market for electronic reading devices. One year ago, there was much excitement regarding the potential for the Kindle DX to revolutionize the market for textbooks. The Kindle DX is a larger version of Amazon.com’s popular Kindle device which is more suitable for larger formats such as textbooks. Several business schools aggressively rolled out materials specifically designed for the Kindle DX. The results of the experiment are now in and according to the Financial Times, the device has received very mixed reviews. Read this article for more details.

Tilson is Bullish on Large Cap Stocks Including J&J, Microsoft and Berkshire

In a wide ranging discussion this morning on CNBC, Whitney Tilson provides his views regarding the overall valuation of large capitalization stocks compared to bonds and comments on several specific companies including Johnson & Johnson, Microsoft, and Berkshire Hathaway. We highlighted some of Mr. Tilson’s views on Microsoft in a bullish article on the company posted on August 31. To view the video, read the rest of this article.

Microsoft’s Depressed Stock Price Attracts Flock of Value Investors

At the turn of the century, few observers could have possibly foreseen that Microsoft would become a favorite bargain purchase for value investors in 2010. The dot com boom was in the process of peaking and any company even vaguely associated with software or technology traded at stratospheric multiples of earnings. Ten years later, Microsoft is statistically cheap but is it a great potential investment or a classic “value trap”? Read this article for one opinion.

Assessing Ballmer’s Track Record at Microsoft

When Bill Gates promoted Steve Ballmer to the chief executive position at Microsoft over ten years ago, the company was flying high in terms of investor perceptions and had a cutting edge image placing it at the forefront of America’s high tech boom. Despite initial setbacks during the mid 1990s related to understanding the transformative power of the internet, Microsoft quickly recovered and expectations for the company’s future were very high in early 2000. Fast forward one decade: Today, Microsoft is perceived as a stodgy company that may still generate a great deal of cash but is hopelessly behind the technology curve and may be destined for inevitable decline. Is this a fair portrayal and, if so, to what extent is Mr. Ballmer to blame? Read this article for an opinion.

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